Sunday, March 09, 2014

Pre-digested authentication

A bit of a follow-up to my previous post on Digest authentication.

The fun thing about doing the hard yards to code up the algorithm is that you get a deeper level of understanding about what's going on. Take these lines:

    v_in_str := utl_raw.cast_to_raw(i_username||':'||i_realm||':'||i_password);
    v_ha1 := lower(DBMS_OBFUSCATION_TOOLKIT.md5(input => v_in_raw));

Every time we build the "who we are" component for this site, we start with exactly the same hash made up of the username, realm (site) and password. This is a batch routine, which means somewhere we would store the username and password for the site - whether that is a parameter in a scheduling tool, coded into a shell script or OS file, or somewhere in the database. If you've got the security option for Oracle, you can use the Wallet, with its own security layers.

But digest authentication gives us another option. Since we actually use the hashed value of the user/site/password, we can store that instead. The receiving site has no idea the code doesn't actually know the REAL password.

Now turn that over in your head. We can call the web service as this user WITHOUT knowing the password, just by knowing the hash. I don't know about you, but it makes me a little bit more worried when I hear of user details being leaked or hacked from sites. It's all very well reassuring us the passwords are hashed and can't be reverse engineered (assuming your own password can't be brute-forced). But depending on the security mechanism, a leak of those hashes can be dangerous. If a hacked provider advises people to change their passwords, take their advice. 

'Basic' authentication doesn't have the same weakness. In that environment the provider can store the password hash after applying their own 'secret sauce' mechanism (mostly a salt). When you authenticate, you send the password, they apply the secret sauce and compare the result. You can't get away without knowing the password, because all the work is done at their end.

There's no secret sauce for digest authentication, and there can't be. Even if the provider had the password in the clear, there's no way they can be sure the client has the password since all the client needs is the result of the hash. The provider must store, or be able to work out, the result of that hash because they need to replicate the final hash result using both the client and server nonces. They can store either that same user/realm/password hash as is, or they can encrypt it in a reversible manner, but a one-way hash wouldn't be usable.

In short, digest authentication means that our batch routine doesn't need to 'know' the actual password, just a hash. But it also makes those hashes a lot more dangerous.

I'm an amateur in this field. I checked around and it does seem this is a recognized limitation of digest authentication. EG: This Q&A and this comparison of Digest and Basic.

Saturday, March 08, 2014

PL/SQL, UTL_HTTP and Digest Authentication

For the first time in what seems like ages, I've actually put together a piece of code worth sharing. It's not that I haven't been working, but just that it has all been very 'in-house' specific.

However I had a recent requirement to use a web service that makes use of Digest Authentication. If you have look at the UTL_HTTP SET_AUTHENTICATION subprogram, it only addresses Basic authentication (and, apparently, Amazon S3 which looks intriguing).

In Basic authentication, the username and password get sent across as part of the request. Going through SSL, that doesn't seem too bad, as it is encrypted over the transfer and the certificates should ensure you are talking to the legitimate destination. However if that destination has been compromised, you've handed over your username and password. In an ideal world, the server shouldn't need to know your password, which is why database should only have hashed versions of passwords. 

Outside of SSL, you might as well just print the username and password on the back of a postcard.

In Digest authentication, you get a more complex interaction that keeps the password secret. You ask for a page, the server responds with an "Authentication Required" plus some bits of information including a nonce. You come up with a hashed value based on the server nonce, your own nonce and a hash of your username and password and send it back with the next request. The server has its own record of your username/password hash and can duplicate the calculations. If everyone is happy, the server can fulfill your request and nobody ever actually needs to know the password.

Our server used SSL, and thanks to Tim's article on SSL and UTL_HTTP, it was a simple set up. I've done it before, but that was in the days when it seemed a lot hard to get certificates OUT of a browser to put them in your Oracle Wallet.

The Interwebs were a lot less forthcoming on a PL/SQL implementation of Digest authentication though. The closest I got was this discussion, which can be summed up as "This may be complex, but I do not see these offhand as being impossible to do in PL/SQL....No Digest configured web server nearby or I would definitely have had a bash at this"

A read through the Wikipedia article, and I came up with the code below:

Firstly, after the initial request, go through the header to get the 'WWW-Authenticate' item. Take the value associated with that header, and pass it to the "auth_digest" procedure. 

    l_max := UTL_HTTP.GET_HEADER_COUNT(l_http_response);
    l_ind := 1;
    l_name := '-';
    while l_ind <= l_max AND l_name != 'WWW-Authenticate' LOOP
      UTL_HTTP.GET_HEADER(l_http_response, l_ind, l_name, l_value);
      IF  l_name = 'WWW-Authenticate'
      AND l_http_response.status_code = UTL_HTTP.HTTP_UNAUTHORIZED THEN
        -- Unauthorized. Using the Authorization response header, we can come up with the
        -- required values to allow a re-request with the authentication/authorisation details
        l_http_request := UTL_HTTP.BEGIN_REQUEST(l_server||l_method);
        auth_digest (io_http_request => l_http_request, i_auth_value => l_value,
          i_username => nvl(i_username,'xxxx'), i_password => nvl(i_password,'xxxx'), 
          i_req_path => l_method, i_client_nonce => null);
        dbms_output.put_line($$PLSQL_LINE||':Get Response from authenticated request');
        l_http_response := UTL_HTTP.GET_RESPONSE(l_http_request);
        dump_resp (l_http_response);
        dump_hdr (l_http_response);
      END IF;
      l_ind := l_ind + 1;


The auth_digest starts with an extraction of the 'valuables' from that value string. I've used regular expressions here. I spent time working with grep, awk and perl, and regexes are habit forming.

  procedure extract_auth_items
    (i_text in varchar2,
    o_realm out varchar2, o_qop out varchar2, o_nonce out varchar2, o_opaque out varchar2) is
    o_realm   := substr(regexp_substr(i_text, 'realm="[^"]+' ),8);
    o_qop     := substr(regexp_substr(i_text, 'qop="[^"]+'   ),6);
    o_nonce   := substr(regexp_substr(i_text, 'nonce="[^"]+' ),8);
    o_opaque  := substr(regexp_substr(i_text, 'opaque="[^"]+'),9);

  end extract_auth_items;

Next is the 'meat' where the values are combined in the various hashes. Yes, there's a hard-coded default client nonce in there that, by a strange coincidence, matches on in the wikipedia article. That's how this stuff gets developed, by following through a worked example. Just like school.

  function digest_auth_md5_calcs
      (i_username     in varchar2, i_password     in varchar2, i_req_path      in varchar2,
      i_realm         in varchar2, i_server_nonce in varchar2,
      i_qop           in varchar2 default 'auth',
      i_client_nonce  in varchar2 default '0a4f113b',
      i_req_type      in varchar2 default 'GET',  i_req_cnt IN NUMBER default 1)
  return varchar2 is
    v_in_str    varchar2(2000);
    v_in_raw    raw(2000);
    v_out       varchar2(60);
    v_ha1       varchar2(40);
    v_ha2       varchar2(40);
    v_response  varchar2(40);
    v_in_str := i_username||':'||i_realm||':'||i_password;
    v_in_raw := utl_raw.cast_to_raw(v_in_str);
    v_out := DBMS_OBFUSCATION_TOOLKIT.md5(input => v_in_raw);
    v_ha1 := lower(v_out);
    v_in_str := i_req_type||':'||i_req_path;
    v_in_raw := utl_raw.cast_to_raw(v_in_str);
    v_out := DBMS_OBFUSCATION_TOOLKIT.md5(input => v_in_raw);
    v_ha2 := lower(v_out);
    v_in_str := v_ha1||':'||i_server_nonce||':'||lpad(i_req_cnt,8,0)||':'||
    v_in_raw := utl_raw.cast_to_raw(v_in_str);
    v_out := DBMS_OBFUSCATION_TOOLKIT.md5(input => v_in_raw);
    v_response := lower(v_out);
    return v_response;
  end digest_auth_md5_calcs;

And this is the full auth_digest bit

  procedure auth_digest
    (io_http_request  in out UTL_HTTP.REQ,  i_auth_value    in varchar2,
    i_username        in varchar2,          i_password      in varchar2,
    i_req_path        in varchar2,          i_qop           in varchar2 default 'auth',
    i_req_cnt         in number default 1,  i_client_nonce  in varchar2 default null)
    l_realm         varchar2(400);
    l_qop           varchar2(30);
    l_server_nonce  VARCHAR2(400);
    l_opaque        varchar2(100);
    l_response      varchar2(40);
    l_value         VARCHAR2(1024);
    l_client_nonce  varchar2(30);
    -- Apply the username / password for Digest authentication
    extract_auth_items (i_auth_value,
                    l_realm, l_qop, l_server_nonce, l_opaque);
    IF i_client_nonce is not null then
      l_client_nonce := i_client_nonce;
      l_client_nonce := lower(utl_raw.cast_to_raw(DBMS_OBFUSCATION_TOOLKIT.md5(
    END IF;
    l_response := digest_auth_md5_calcs
      (i_username => i_username, i_password    => i_password,     i_req_path => i_req_path,
      i_realm     => l_realm,    i_server_nonce => l_server_nonce,
      i_client_nonce => l_client_nonce);
    --i_qop default to auth, i_req_type default to GET and i_req_cnt default to 1
    l_value := 'Digest username="' ||i_username          ||'",'||
               ' realm="'          ||l_realm             ||'",'||
               ' nonce="'          ||l_server_nonce      ||'",'||
               ' uri="'            ||i_req_path          ||'",'||
               ' response="'       ||l_response          ||'",'||
               ' qop='             ||i_qop               ||',' ||
               ' nc='              ||lpad(i_req_cnt,8,0) ||',' ||
               ' cnonce="'         ||i_client_nonce      ||'"'
    IF l_opaque is not null then
      l_value := l_value||',opaque="'||l_opaque||'"';
    END IF;
    UTL_HTTP.SET_HEADER(io_http_request, 'Authorization', l_value);

  end auth_digest;

A package with the code is available from my CodeSpace page, or directly here. There's a lot of debug 'stuff' in there. The code I'm using is still tailored to my single specific need, and I've stripped specific values from this published variant. You'll need to hard-code or parameterize it for any real use. I may be able to do a 'cleaned-up' version in the future, but don't hold your breath.